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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
thompson has been red hot. only 13 tonight. but golden state takes the lead on that basket. stephen curry fantastic again. he drops a three here. but the game was tied. another monster night. 30 points, 15 rebounds. warriors lead by two. aside from the 28 points curry had, he finds him with this pass. warriors win 109-102. >>> the new york jets quarterback controversy has made its way to capitol hill. >> coach ryan, he's got a problem. he has three quarterbacks. he can't decide who their quarterback is going to be. it's about the same problem republicans are having. >> at the quarterback cliff. >>> no. 3, how far can you hit the world's longest golf club? this guy whacked it 146 yards. >>> no. 2, javale mcgee, he takes out his own teammate. >>> no. 1, dana king, last chance. we're gonna have a play at the play! he is -- >> she's got it! >> and she's gonna go out a winner! and she goes out a winner! >> oh! oh! >> congratulations! this will be the fastest champagne i ever drank. how much time is left in this newscast? >> no, no! >> oh! >> oh! >> i didn't ,,,,,,,, you won't take my life. yo
. they are under our section called news about books. pulitzers this year, stephen greenblatt won for general nonfiction this word history delete many maribel, one for malcolm x and biography or autobiography. john lewis gaddis, george f. kennan and american life. what is this word about? >> guest: to swerve if i remember right, i admit i dipped into the book when it came out. it's fascinating. it was a little on the side of being i don't want to say -- intellectual. i don't mean to say that dismissively. that is about a palm. help me here. do you remember the name of the palm? we are funky and this exam here. rediscovered in the renaissance and then it changed the way it was published i guess you would say. printed or something. >> host: i didn't mean to but she was the spot there. >> guest: the cultures where did that and put in more modern take on life and the fear of dying is to put the fear of dying, which is far more predominate and stops people from doing things prior. at least that's the part of this work. >> host: sarah weinman, if a book is nominated or wins a national book award ar
. pulitzers this year, stephen greeneblack won this work, history, manning mirabel won for malcolm x, autobiography john lewis gas's george f. kennan, an american life. what is this swerve about? >> was a little on the side of being intellectual. i don't mean to say that dismissively. it is about a poem. the remember the name of the poem? >> not offhand. [talking over each other] >> rediscovered in the renaissance. then it changed the way -- it was published -- >> brought out. >> printed. >> and mean to put you on the spot but it is called "the swerve". cultures swerve a bit and took on a modern take on life and fear dying is the big thing. it dealt with the fear of dying which was more predominant and stopped people from doing things prior to this and that is part of "the swerve". >> of the book is nominated wins a national book award or nominated and wins a pulitzer does it change sales? >> as an example to answer your question, the pulitzer prize did not award a prize in fiction this year which was the first time that it happened since the late 1970s and there was a huge uproar la
'reilly was channelling stephen colbert like a drunk stephen colbert. if you haven't caught that segment, it was breath-taking. >> bill: it came up to me again. we had our white house correspondents association, the first party of the year first christmas party, wasn't even in december. they had it on the 29th of november. and so, you know it was awkward because i walked in, and i said like, merry christmas to somebody. and they said, happy holidays. and then i said happy holidays to somebody and they said, no, you can say merry christmas to me. i am thinking jesus. get off. careful here. >> happeny holidays? they are judging you? you know, the war on christmas thing, the happy holidays, customary christmas, it's about good manners, you know. somebody says, you know happy dwanza or something i don't celebrate, i don't say how dare you. i want to say thanks for including me in whatever it is you do and merry christmas to you. >> somebody says happy holidays to me, i am a christian but i am not offended by that. i understand why stores, in stores, they have salespeople
, next. stephen ohlemacher will join us, followed by roundtable discussion. first news update from c-span radio. >> its data clock 33 eastern. defense secretary leon panetta is in afghanistan today. in remarks to about 100 u.s. service members inside an aircraft hangar at a desert base, he thanked them for their service and emphasized that the u.s. is winding down its involvement in the war. he also said that president obama will decide in the next few weeks how many u.s. troops will stay in afghanistan after the combat mission ends in december of 2014. there are currently 56,000 u.s. troops there. north koreans dancing in the streets of their capital today after the regime successfully fired a long-range rockets, defying international warnings. gallants is likely to bring fresh sanctions and other punishment from the u.s. and its allies, which were quick to condemn its asked a test a technology for a missile that could attack the u.s. mainland. p'yongyang says it was merely a peaceful efforts to put a satellite into orbit. national security council spokesman is calling the launch "a
, but i'm wondering if you think it's stunt or serious. comedian stephen colbert wanting demint's seat. >> well, he can certainly run for office and try to earn it. but nikki haley, the governor of south carolina, will be choosing who will replace jim demint. i worked for bill frist and he had a joke, as majority leader, that it's like being undertaker. 99 people under you and no one listening. so perhaps jim demint felt that no one was listening. but as someone who actually believes in service and in the honor of being a united states senator, i don't exactly agree with quitting your term midway after all the people who worked so hard for you, who raised money, who went to the polls to support you. it's going to stay in our seat because the governor of south carolina is a republican, yet i think that jim demint did owe his constituents a little bit more than two years. >> i actually agree with amy on that. and unfortunately, he's getting a lot of comparisons with sarah palin, which can't really be a good thing. >> what about just very, very quickly, because we're almost out of time, a
on what is already a fragile economic recovery. stephen moore joins us. when economic growth was comparatively pretty good, this the president said no, now you don't want to raise tax rates because the economy is fragile. gdp is worse now, is that? >> i think almost exactly two years ago, the president said the economy is too fragile to raise taxes on anyone. so what you have essentially was a deal that was put together. remember back in december of 2010 when we were facing a very similar situation where they agreed to extend all the tax cuts for two years. by the way, that is why we are facing this new fiscal cliff. it is infuriating to business owners. i have been talking to a lot of them last couple of weeks. this is banana republic type of politics. no one knows what it will look like. it makes it impossible for businesses to do planning, purchasing equipment, hiring workers. you are seeing the impact on the stock market already where we have a lousy 10 days with stocks because everybody is in this kind of state of fear and trepidation that we are going to go over this cl
with senator stephens on this, we got it done, so that facility stabbeds as a tribute to tan inouye. in 2010 i had a very difficult campaign, as most of us did at that time. and dan said, i'm going to come out there and help you. and i was under fierce attack, and we had an event for veterans, and dan was the speaker and i was the speaker, and as i was speaking we heard these voices of -- screaming demonstrators yelling things, which were not complimentary toward me. let's put it that way. but it was very loud, and i was so humiliate and embarrassed to hear what that's amazing patriot, and keep screaming when danny was speaking about my work and his work. sure enough, the demonstrators kept it up and i was so upset, and i went up to him and i put my arm around him and said, dan, i'm so embarrassed, i'm so sorry. he says, barbara, they're not going to beat you by screaming. don't worry about it. and he went on to go to a couple of events, and took his wife to them, and it was extraordinary. i love danny with all my heart. everytime i looked at him i smiled because he was so good. such a good pe
for chris stephens and for the united states, their great -- gratitude for our country provide, i think, a measure of hope. that demonstration of afiction for america and for our envoy who gave his life for those people summed up exactly why we must not look inwards and walk away. finally, let me just say that what happened in benghazi really can't be seen in isolation. there's a truth about diplomacy and foreign service that needs to be processed through the committee and the congress and the country as we examine the events of men ghazi. we have an expeditionary diplomatic corps, and they do face very real risks every day, day in and day out. bad things have happened before, and bad things will happen again, unfortunately, in the future. there will always be a tension between the diplomatic imperative to get outside the wire and the security standards that require our diplomats to work behind high walls and full-body searches. we do not want to conner is tee that wire america off from the world. our challenge is to strike a balance between the necessity of the mission, available resou
summits. now we saw stephen crowder who works here punched in the face, a tent knocked down. i want to get your take on all of this because the silence from president civility is deafening here. they are his allies and he has some sway with them. >> in a number of cases, particularly with threats of violence in michigan, i hope the governor of michigan would call on the president to ask his allies to behave in a civil and decent manner. there's no justification for people threatening violence. i think one of the democratic state senators in michigan said that thereai will be blood. what kind of comment is that from an elected official and why is it being tolerated? i always think the networks and the new york sometimes and others have a real obligation to cover union violence when it occurs and not hide it. i think you're raising a good point. it's one that we should be aggressive in demanding that the president call on his allies to exercise discipline and civility. >> sean: do you remember duringy the tea party rallies? you were speaking about the s media. the media would search high and
exposure therapy. >> comfortable. >> yes. >> you can hear me. >>es. >> stephen king was there the day to the we ares fell. and he's been dealing with it ever since. >> i had a, just such a total feeling that i wasn't the same person. >> like many other rescue workers king has post traumatic stress disorder. he's been through therapy but it didn't work. so now he's trying this virtual therapy. >> i was almost shaking. i mean it brought it back like i was there again watching it. >> it's called virtual reality therapy or vrt. and it uses sounds and 3 d images to force patients to face their fears. >> very slowly patients are taken back to their traumatic experiences. and steven's case, a virtual journey back to september 11th. >> here's how it works. first the patient sees the towers as they were before the attacks. then a plane appears and flies behind to the percent. experts say this readies the patient for what is about to happen. next a plane hits the first tower but without sound. then the fullxperience authentic pictures and surrounds taken from video shot that dayment because it
with stephen dinan. our guest is stephen moore with "the wall street journal." then a look back at columbine shootings with david cullen. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c- span. >> as president obama begins his second term, what are the most important issues to consider in 2013? tell us. >> kagel you are in grade 6-12, make a video about what you would like to say to the president. >> get your chance to win the grand prize of $5,000. the deadline is january 18. for more information, go to studentcam.org. >> today, president obama nominated senior massachusetts senator john kerry for secretary of state. he is a vietnam war veteran and chairman of the senate foreign lakers -- senate foreign relations committee. this is just under 10 minutes. >> good afternoon, everyone. you know, when i took office, our nation was engaged in two wars and al qaida was entrenched in their safe havens. many of our alliances were frayed and america's standing in the world had suffered. over the past four years, we've begun a new era of american leadership. we ended the war in iraq. we pu
, morgan lander and stephen nicholas is with us, ed moy and rick lake was with us earlier. chad morgan lander, what do you do? investors are watching all of this, they want some direction and they want to get ready for 2030 and the nonsense continues in washington. >> well, the market is going to get sloppy over the next two weeks until they get a resolution, and you should fully expect that they will get a resolution, and it will be just a short-term resolution. once you get, that the market will then snap back, so we're expecting between a 5% and 7% correction within the market until that time comes, but do you want to layer in risk. you want to be buying good quality companies at this point in time as the market comes into, because that market will snap back, and you will see a modicum of economic growth going further out into the spring. >> and i can see that apple is one of the ones that you like there in terms of snapping up beaten down stocks. you see 20% upside. ed, i want to get to you because i was reading through your bio and you worked at the white house for almost six year
with where we just went. >> i love -- i love stephen a. smith. i'm uncomfortable where you just went. our documentary, "black in america," what it was all about. rg3 doesn't fit into parker's sense of what real blackness is. >> like a stereotype. people advocating against stereotypes, stereotyping themselves their own people. >> it's so -- it's so offensive on so many levels. you lined up three white guys to talk about this thing, this term cornball brother, and i tooked an informal poll, and all my black friends. have you ever heard the term, the answer is unanimously by the way no. it turned robert griffin iii, any sense of individuality, and he wants to be defined by who i am, which is a great afrifricki quarterback. >> he feels like he's dodging the question. are you -- what is the role of race in being this great quarterback? right? and for people of color, it's often a challenge. he wants to say i don't want to be defined by being the black quarterback, but at the same time i want to represent all of the black people who look at me as a great quarterback. mr. parker took some great
programs about economics. arlie hochschild. then tomorrow stephen han and sara gordon sit down with booktv to talk about their books. also on sunday at 2 p.m. eastern danny danon discussing his book, "israel: the will to prevail," followed by patrick tyler, author of "fortress israel: the inside story of the military elite who run the country and why they can't make peace." watch this and more all weekend long on booktv. for a complete schedule can, visit booktv.org. >> strangle me -- [inaudible] >> give it to him hard! >> he's not safe on that bus. >> i've been on that bus. they are just as good as gold. >> as all of us, i think, in this country we're starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us had experienced in one way or another and had had no words for other than adolescence, other than growing up. finally people were starting to stand back and say, hold on, this isn't actually a normal part of growing up, this isn't a normal rite of passage. i think there was of a moment where there is a possibility for change, and dire
with stephen that the original is a little outdated in terms of facing all the myriad threats and predation that developed in the war on terror and passed very shortly after 9/11 and we know a lot more from our experience so congress appropriately decided it was time for them to take a look at whether or not we needed to be more explicit and in some areas expand on the a u.s. map. to be in favor of something that did require congress to revisit that every couple years it would be useful to make sure our political leadership rather than leave that hanging out there is something for the next ten years as things develop, as threats either expand or recede, our political leaders in congress should appropriately way in, from justice jackson's famous concurrence with congress and the executive acting together that that is the height of authority in these military matters. the executive is constantly involved in these things. we know where the executive stand but congress can act and sit back and the executive from the law so useful clarifying function for the courts if congress does periodically
that killed chris stephens and three other americans with direct knowledge of the investigation. the u.s. source tells me the fbi which is conducting the investigation, has not had access to him yet. the source says following the attack, ahmed very quickly popped up on their radar, so they have been looking at him for some time. the official would not comment on what led them to him. joe. >> so what do we know about this guy? he's a radical, certainly, and he's been on the radar, but what more do we know about him? >> we know he's 45 years old, masters degree in sharia law. he's also believed to be the driving force behind a new terror group seeking to align itself with al qaeda. this is according to both the u.s. and an egyptian official. the egyptian official said he has denied any connection to the afacon the u.s. consulate or affiliation with al qaeda, but he's also believed to be connected to a heavily armed terror cell raided in october in egypt. five people were arrested at that time. >> right, and probably not the only suspect, right? is the fbi making more progress in this? >>
. thank you. >> so, good to have you here. i'm stephen dinan, politics editor at the washington times. i believe what if she said. you can learn a lot about in the national stage from immigration conversations and the latino voter in particular, from what went on in arizona, particularly the counterfactual explosion of the limits of -- test the limits of what we can learn about latino voters and their effect on electoral politics and on policy. so, i guess i'd like to start with just sort of a basic question. if somebody were to ask you what a -- the white voter is, i would have no clue how to actually answer that question. so, let's start with the very tough one, which is what is the latino voter? what is a latino voter, in particular, what is the latino voter in arizona? who is he or she? how much of the electorate, how much of the population, the citizenry, who is that person? >> okay. as many in the audience already know, the latino population in the it's is very diverse. various origin, mexican american primarily, also cubans and puerto ricans. in america the latino population is pr
thing verbatim. to stephen barlett, copy to ds command center, subject benghazi up to you. the command center is sharing a terrorism event information for your situational awareness. these contact the ds command center for any requester information. as of 0500 eastern standard time the mission of benghazi has been evacuated due to ongoing attacks that resulted in the death of four chiefs of mission personnel, including u.s. ambassador to libya to three additional wounded. at this time, everyone has been evacuated to tripoli as receiving medical aid and awaiting further movement. this is an initial terrorist incident report from the ds command center. this information contained in this report is provided only for immediate situational awareness. additional reports may follow. updating and correcting information protect accordingly. spu this e-mail is unclassified number prevented by voodoo christopher r. page 101. my concern is this, we knew from the start that it was a terrorist attack. it was a terrorist event and for whatever reason we chose to call it something else, a youtube video
different ways. we appreciate your service. we remember that ambassador stephens was a hallmark of what foreign service was all about. our challenge here and abroad in the context of terrorism is that the terrorists only have to be lucky once. we have to get it right when hundred percent of the time. it is a heavy burden. it is not an easy one. this time we do not get it right obviously. the state acknowledges where it made a mistake. i find it extraordinary that congress passed blame on one side and never seem to take responsibility of its own. i still hear voices that will not accept responsibility. i hear from 18 accountability boards. this may be the first it i am not mistaken. obviously this is going back over administrations. you cannot implement the recommendations if one is about the resources and you do not have the resources by congress to meet those recommendations. the state and the congress should look at the responsibility to protect our embassies and diplomatic personnel abroad. reading directly from the unclassified section of the report, the accountability review board
. four americans, including u.s. ambassador chris stephens, were killed in that attack back on september 11 of this year. the independent report calls security at the benghazi consulate, quote, grossly inadequate. it also criticizes the state department for what security was there and relying on local militias. but it does recommend no disciplinary action, at least right now. the report says the attack was the work of terrorists, and that despite those initial reports, there was no protest outside the consulate before that attack. >> what i thought was interesting was our secretary of state's reaction. because ultimately, she is in charge of the state department. we know she's been suffering from this concussion and many people have said, that was very convenient. >> right, questioning the timing. >> questioning the timing. but she says the accountability review board report provides a clear look at syria's systemic challenges that we've begun to fix and says i accept every one of them. so clearly taking responsibility for the state department and saying listen, we've already begun to fi
schwarzkop died at the age of 78. supreme court justice stephen briar talks about the united states constitution and the history of the rule of law. this interview was part of a discussion on china opposed the legal system hosted by the brookings institution. china's >> ok. concepts. for 20 years i have been advising -- roughly half of that on financial economic matters. the other half a variety of topics. about 10 years ago, we started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the states. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, stud
times" stephen diner, and also the professor of politics at asu. thank you. take it away. >> hello. good to have you here. i am a politics editor at "the washington times. " i think you can learn a lot about the national stage from the latino voter, from what went on in arizona, particularly the limits, test the limits of what we can learn about latino voters and their effect on the electoral politics and on policy. i guess i would like to start with a basic question. if someone were to ask me, what the white voter is? i would have no clue how to answer that question. what is the latino voter in arizona? how much of the electorate, how much of the population, is to listen rate, who is that person. as many of the audience know, the latino population is very perverse. mexican-american, cupid and porter ricans. the latino population is like in neighboring states, primarily of mexican origin. one thing that is unique is a lot of them are recent arrivals, not necessarily for a-porn, but having migrated from california to new mexico because the drop of jobs opportunity if the past decade or so
tax hike if we don't act. for weeks stephen has been trying to get the president to come up with a fair, reasonable and balanced solution so we don't go over the cliff. the president thinking he has some sort of a mandate after his reelection has been less than reasonable. in fact, this president has proposed more and more spending and more and more tax hikes in his proposals to the spreerk while the spreerk is -- speaker to is trying to deal with our $16 trillion debt, now $16.4 trillion. the president just can't take yes for an answer. he must think if he keeps slow walking these proposals, the republicans will get the blame and members of his administration have even revealed that they would be more than happy if we went over the cliff. what kind of cruel christmas gift is that? after the speaker and the president exchanged offers this week, house republicans are looking at having votes on two competing pieces of legislation as early as tomorrow. the first is legislation that passed this body over the summer, deeply flawed legislation that every democrat in this body supp
that connection. so the whole idea you bring up, stephen, that you believe that -- to connect the taxes they are paying with what they are getting in some respects, i agree with you and that is one of the challenges. on the first point, i take exception to you saying that my request for raising the cap on social security is a knee-jerk reaction. knee-jerk reaction is a description of somebody just sort of making a decision without thinking about it. i have put a lot of thought on the issue. you and i may disagree on the best solution but i put a lot of thought into it and i think it is the best solution. it may be a solution i am not successful at achieving in terms of a final deal. but if you want to look at the long-term solvency of social security, it is a great way to address it. >> -- host: just a few thoughts, first from our facebook page from a viewer. guest: on the first point about dreams versus reality, i think that what happened last night on capitol hill, the house republican conference will, in fact, help folks realize that it is going to take a bipartisan bill. you can't r
would you feel? >> just on the j.f.k. assasination thing. i just read one of stephen king's new books which is about the assasination and a man who has the ability to go back in time and tries to stop the assasination of j.f.k. does that mean we should put a thing on the front and say this didn't happen? at what point is it someone's responsibility to find out whether there is a backing up of that argument. it seems ridiculous when it's about time travel because there is no time travel yet. to a lot of people that would be absurd, where is that line? it's a gray area. >> i think the answer to somebody who will look at -- watch "24" and say see didn't i tell you americans are torture amongers. it goes to the old question of what is the effect, what's the cause and what's the effect of art and on public perception and behavior. would i personally feel responsible? i thought about it and i do think we all bear some responsibility but not complete responsibility. so somebody who doesn't have a critical capacity to turn on a television and realize this is fiction, this is not a representat
parts and do you have to do your homework, we can't do it for you. >> stephen, good to see you. >> thank you. >>> a winter storm is dumping snow, ice and lots of travel problem notice northeast ths in week. >>> and which retailers were the winners this holiday season and which ones did come up short? the opening sbael little less than four minutes away. re a bus. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work
would like to talk a little bit about the fact that stephens said something about the one republican senator. what about harry reid and the veto on everything that comes from the house if he does not like it? the filibuster is that harry reid can decide he will not take it up, but they cannot filibuster? guest: first of all, the filibuster is not in the constitution. it is not a pocket veto, but it is something only the president can do. you are right in the sense that the majority is what determines what the agenda will be. john boehner decides what will come to the floor and when. you just saw it in the house. the unwillingness of john boehner to take up the extended tax cuts. this is not anything new. this is a long tradition in both houses. you have a split congress with both sides not working together. you are exactly right, this is the majority of one house, moving into the other. host: are you still there? caller: i agree with his explanation, but everything comes across two very read and he does not bring it up for a vote, then my senator, that meet stabbed now -- at least ca
the program is stephen olmacher, joining us from the associated press. how many people in america receive social security? how much social security to people get? guest: >> 66 million people. the average benefit is a little over $12,000 -- a little over $1,200 a month. maybe $13,000 a year or so. host: we are talking about retirees and the disabled. guest: a fairly wide group of people receive social security benefits. retired workers, spouses, children, disabled workers, widows, woodward's. -- widowers. a big safety net of people. host: retirees receive about $1,200 a month on average. the benefits for the disabled, $1,100 a month on average. how does social security get financed? guest: it has been a self-funded program since its inception. it is funded by payroll taxes. there's a 12.4% tax on wages up to about $110,000. if you make more than that, any money you make over that is not taxed as part of social security. the tax is divided equally between your employer and the worker. for the past two years, the workers' share of 6.2% has been reduced temporarily to 4.2%. as the temporary t
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)